Get Adobe Flash player


HomeSite MapSubject IndexFeedbackBuy The Book!  

Bed-Wetting (Enuresis)Back Next
Part 4 as Part 4 in pdf formatpdf
Part 4: Keeping Your Child Healthy  >  The A-Z of Childhood Illnesses  >  Bed-Wetting (Enuresis)

BED-WETTING (ENURESIS)

Bed-wetting must be differentiated from the situation where the child’s nappy or pant is wet all the time during the day as well as at night. In such a condition, immediately see your doctor to rule out urinary infection, any congenital abnormality of the urinary tract, diabetes or diseases connected with the nervous system.

You need worry about bed-wetting only if your child is constantly wetting his bed in sleep after his fourth birthday. Ordinarily, as soon as the bladder of a child aged 3 or more becomes full, he gets signals from his bladder to empty it. In some families, this system takes more time to develop. It is possible that your older child or even your husband had a similar history. And knowing this usually helps the prognosis. Incidentally, girls tend to achieve bladder control earlier than boys. It is reported that 77% of children suffer from enuresis if both parents were enuretic as children, and 44% when only one parent has a positive history. If one identical twin has enuresis, there is a 40% to 50% chance that the other will have the same problem, independent of the parents’ status. For non-identical twins, this likelihood decreases to 20%.

CAUSES: Bed-wetting beyond the age of 4 is possibly due to a delay in the maturation of the nervous system that controls the bladder mechanism — for inherited reasons or otherwise. 

Take note, however, if your child who has remained dry all through the night for a sufficiently long period reverts to bedwetting. There are usually psychological factors causing such ‘accidents’. Examples of these could be sibling rivalry due to the arrival of a new baby, moving to a new house, joining a new school or emotional disturbance because of a problem at home or in school.

MANAGEMENT: A child who wets the bed is not doing it ‘to teach you a lesson’, nor are you an inefficient parent. The fact is that he cannot control his bladder. Hence, he deserves to be understood rather than punished. He should not be put to shame for this act in the presence of others, especially his friends. It appears that, in general, development of bladder and bowel control is a maturational process that cannot be accelerated by early onset and high intensity of toilet training.

Some parents restrict the intake of fluids towards late evening; it is worthwhile seeing if this works for your child. Another method is the ‘alarm device’, an electric appliance connected to a pad on which the child sleeps. As soon as the child passes the first few drops of urine, the alarm rings. If your child is amenable, explain to him that this is a signal for him to wake up and pass urine. Otherwise, wake him up yourself, have him put off the alarm and pass urine. Gradually, he will be conditioned to stop passing urine as soon as he hears the alarm. In due course of time, he will be conditioned to control his urge to pass urine until he wakes in the morning. Continue using the alarm device for a month or two after control has been achieved.

Drugs may be prescribed in resistant cases. Imipramine is commonly prescribed. If used and found helpful, it must be continued for a period of 3 months. Do not use this drug without the advice of your doctor, because it has known side effects. Desmopressin, in the form of a nasal way, has also been found to be helpful. An oral preparation of desmopressin (not yet available in the market) is preferred because nasal delivery can be compromised by the common cold and allergic rhinitis. Fortunately, most cases can be handled without drugs and with the help of a competent and sympathetic physician.


Laughter And The Passage Of Urine 

Mention may also be made of children who, although they otherwise have full control of their bladders, involuntarily pass urine when they suddenly burst out laughing. This condition improves spontaneously as the child grows up.




7 March, 2016

 
Part 4
The A-Z of Childhood Illnesses

Abdominal Pain
Abrasions or Scratches
Acute Glomerulonephritis
Acute Nephritis
Acute Watery Diarrhoea
Addictions
Adenoids
AIDS
Allergies
Anaemia
Anorexia (Poor Appetite)
Asthma
ADHD
Autism
Backache
Bed-Wetting (Enuresis)
Birth Deformities
Bites and Stings
Bleeding
Bone, Joint and Muscle Injuries
Bowlegs and Knock-Knees
Breathlessness
Bronchiolitis
Burns
Calcium Deficiency
Cancer
Cardiac Pulmonary Resuscitation
Cerebral Palsy (CP)
Chickenpox
Choking
Circumcision
Cleft Lip and Palate
Common Cold
Congenital Heart Disease
Constipation
Convulsions or Fits or Seizures
Cough
Croup
Crying
Cuts
Dengue Fever
Diabetes Mellitus
Diarrhoea, Dysentery ...
Diphtheria
Down's Syndrome
Earache, Ear Infections ...
Electric Shock
Encephalitis
Eye Problems
Fears
Foot Problems
German Measles (Rubella)
Glands in the Neck ...
Headache
Head Injury
Hepatitis
Hydrocephalus
Hypertension
Hypospadias
Influenza (Flu)
Jaundice
Joint Disorders
Kala-Azar
Leptospirosis
Limp and Pain in the Legs
Malaria
Malnutrition (Undernutrition)
Measles
Meningitis
Meningomyelocele
Menstrual Problems
Mental Retardation (MR)
Mouth To Mouth Breathing
Mumps
Nephrotic Syndrome
Nose-Related Problems
Obesity
Pneumonia
Poisoning
Poliomyelitis
Premature Baby
Prolapse of the Rectum
Rabies
Rheumatic Fever
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Rickets
Short Child
Skin Conditions
Sleep and Sleep Problems
Sore Throat (Pharyngitis)
Splinters
Stammering
Stridor (Noisy Breathing)
Teething and Care of Teeth
Tetanus (Lock Jaw)
Thrush
Thumb-Sucking
Tics
Torticollis
Tracheoesophageal Fistula
Tropical Eosinophilia
Tuberculosis (TB)
Typhoid
Umbilical Problems
Undescended Testis
Urinary Infection
Vaginal Discharge
Vomiting
Wheezing
Whooping Cough (Pertusis)



Part 4
Keeping Your Child Healthy
Choosing A Paediatrician
Proper Use of Medicines
Home Remedies
A First Aid Kit
The A-Z of Childhood Illnesses
Psychological Concerns
Managing A Hospital Stay
Emergencies
Prayer And Your Child's Health
The Role of Nature Cure
Homoeopathy
Ayurveda and Child Care
Congenital Heart Disease FAQ
 
Guide to Child Care
Home
Introduction
1 Pregnancy, Childbirth ...
2 The Growing Years
3 Feeding Infants, ...
4 Keeping Your Child Healthy
5 Keeping Your Child Happy
About Dr. R. K. Anand
Testimonials

Home Site Map Subject Index Feedback Buy The Book!    top of page 

© Dr. R. K. Anand