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Part 4: Keeping Your Child Healthy  >  The A-Z of Childhood Illnesses  >  Cardiac Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Mouth-To-Mouth Breathing

CARDIAC PULMONARY RESUSCITATION (CPR) AND MOUTH-TO-MOUTH BREATHING

Timely help can save a life. You must practise the technique of mouth-to-mouth breathing in advance.

Have someone call for an ambulance or a doctor, while you start on the procedures.


Check For Breathing, Not Pulse
Look for movement and any sign of breathing, including coughing. If these are absent, call for an ambulance and start chest compressions.


Positioning Hands

Compressing and releasing the chest (see steps 5 and 6) helps force blood out of the heart and into the rest of the circulatory system. Simply place your hands between the victimís nipples to locate the sternum. For children over age 8, perform 15 compressions before giving 2 rescue breaths.


Mouth-to-Mouth Breathing
Mouth-to-mouth breathing, in which you exhale into the victimís mouth, remains an essential part of CPR. But if you are unable or unwilling to give the mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, chest compressions alone should increase the victimís chance of survival, especially if medical help is imminent.


Steps To Be followed If The Child Stops Breathing

Step 1:
Shout for help to get an extra hand and to summon a doctor.

Step 2: In the case of a child, clear the mouth. Check if anything is stuck in the mouth or throat. Pull the tongue forward. Remove any foreign object or food that can be removed easily with your fingers. If removal seems difficult, follow the section on choking.

Mouth-to-mouth breathing in an older child

Step 3: Let the child lie on his back on the ground or any other firm surface like a strong table. Tilt his head back so that the tip of his nose faces the roof or sky. Open his mouth wide.

Step 4: If he is still not breathing, start mouth-to-mouth breathing. For this, take a deep breath. For an infant, place your mouth over his mouth as well as the nose, closing your mouth firmly over them so that no air leaks. Then, blow gently to make sure that his chest rises a little. Do not blow with too much force in an infant, because you may rupture his lungs.

In case of an older child, pinch his nostrils with one hand and place your mouth only on his mouth. Breathe into the childís mouth forcefully to ensure some lifting of his chest. Give 2 such breaths.

If the chest is not moving, follow Step 2 again.  

Cardiac massage in an infant

If the chest rises with mouth-to-mouth breathing, remove your mouth from his mouth and after every breath, take a deep breath and breathe again into his mouth at a rate of about 20 breaths per minute until he starts breathing on his own or until you are sure that he is dead. This effort may be needed for about an hour.

Step 5: Sometimes, the heart also stops beating in such a situation. After the first two breaths, check the pulse. In small infants, put 2 fingers gently to feel for the pulse in front of the elbow. In older children, feel for the pulsation in the neck a little away from the windpipe at the level of the Adamís apple.

If you cannot feel the pulse, you must begin cardiac (heart) massage by pressing on the breastbone lying in the middle of the chest.

Step 6: If you have help, one of you should do the cardiac massage while the other does mouth-to-mouth breathing. In case of an infant, press on the breastbone with 3 fingers,  placed a little below the level of the nipple. Press the bone about an inch at a rate of about 100 per minute (see illustration).

Cardiac massage in an older child

If you are alone, give one breath for every five compressions (or massage). 

For an older child, you may need to apply more pressure, using the heel of the hand. For an adolescent, you may also need to place the heel of one hand on top of the other hand and then press down about one and half inches (see illustration).

Continue this exercise until you can feel the pulse or until you are sure that the person is dead. It is worth trying this for half an hour to one hour before you give up.


Mouth-to-Mouth Breathing And Drowning
If the child is not breathing on his own, follow the same procedure as given above, under mouth-to-mouth breathing.
Do not waste precious time trying to get water out of his chest. In fact, the person trying to rescue the child is advised to start mouth-to-mouth breathing, as soon as he reaches waters shallow enough to stand in (see illustration).

Mouth-to-mouth breathing in a drowning child




7 March, 2016

 
Part 4
The A-Z of Childhood Illnesses

Abdominal Pain
Abrasions or Scratches
Acute Glomerulonephritis
Acute Nephritis
Acute Watery Diarrhoea
Addictions
Adenoids
AIDS
Allergies
Anaemia
Anorexia (Poor Appetite)
Asthma
ADHD
Autism
Backache
Bed-Wetting (Enuresis)
Birth Deformities
Bites and Stings
Bleeding
Bone, Joint and Muscle Injuries
Bowlegs and Knock-Knees
Breathlessness
Bronchiolitis
Burns
Calcium Deficiency
Cancer
Cardiac Pulmonary Resuscitation
Cerebral Palsy (CP)
Chickenpox
Choking
Circumcision
Cleft Lip and Palate
Common Cold
Congenital Heart Disease
Constipation
Convulsions or Fits or Seizures
Cough
Croup
Crying
Cuts
Dengue Fever
Diabetes Mellitus
Diarrhoea, Dysentery ...
Diphtheria
Down's Syndrome
Earache, Ear Infections ...
Electric Shock
Encephalitis
Eye Problems
Fears
Foot Problems
German Measles (Rubella)
Glands in the Neck ...
Headache
Head Injury
Hepatitis
Hydrocephalus
Hypertension
Hypospadias
Influenza (Flu)
Jaundice
Joint Disorders
Kala-Azar
Leptospirosis
Limp and Pain in the Legs
Malaria
Malnutrition (Undernutrition)
Measles
Meningitis
Meningomyelocele
Menstrual Problems
Mental Retardation (MR)
Mouth To Mouth Breathing
Mumps
Nephrotic Syndrome
Nose-Related Problems
Obesity
Pneumonia
Poisoning
Poliomyelitis
Premature Baby
Prolapse of the Rectum
Rabies
Rheumatic Fever
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Rickets
Short Child
Skin Conditions
Sleep and Sleep Problems
Sore Throat (Pharyngitis)
Splinters
Stammering
Stridor (Noisy Breathing)
Teething and Care of Teeth
Tetanus (Lock Jaw)
Thrush
Thumb-Sucking
Tics
Torticollis
Tracheoesophageal Fistula
Tropical Eosinophilia
Tuberculosis (TB)
Typhoid
Umbilical Problems
Undescended Testis
Urinary Infection
Vaginal Discharge
Vomiting
Wheezing
Whooping Cough (Pertusis)



Part 4
Keeping Your Child Healthy
Choosing A Paediatrician
Proper Use of Medicines
Home Remedies
A First Aid Kit
The A-Z of Childhood Illnesses
Psychological Concerns
Managing A Hospital Stay
Emergencies
Prayer And Your Child's Health
The Role of Nature Cure
Homoeopathy
Ayurveda and Child Care
Congenital Heart Disease FAQ
 
Guide to Child Care
Home
Introduction
1 Pregnancy, Childbirth ...
2 The Growing Years
3 Feeding Infants, ...
4 Keeping Your Child Healthy
5 Keeping Your Child Happy
About Dr. R. K. Anand
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