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Part 4: Keeping Your Child Healthy  >  The A-Z of Childhood Illnesses  >  Choking

CHOKING

SYMPTOMS: Your 2-year-old is eating peanuts and running around. Suddenly, he starts coughing violently. There is a strong possibility that he has inhaled the peanut into his windpipe, resulting in obstruction to the free flow of air. Do not panic. Coughing might help in expelling the peanut. Sometimes, if the obstruction is more severe, due to a  foreign object or food, he may not be able to talk normally and may turn blue. Treat this as an emergency and act quickly as detailed below. Sometimes, a little water or milk or soup or any other liquid tends to go into the windpipe and the child coughs to stop that or to expel the little liquid that might have gone into the windpipe. This need not be a cause of worry.

MANAGEMENT: Emergency steps to be followed:

Step 1: If your small infant has difficulty in breathing and is becoming blue, shout for help. Lay him in a head-down position on your forearm. Let your arm rest on your tilted thigh with his head just below your knee. Then give 4 rapid blows on his back with the heel of your other hand between the 2 shoulder blades (see illustration). It may be inconvenient to rest an older infant on the arm. Lay him face down on your lap, with his head towards the ground and supported with one hand. 

Step 2
: If you find no improvement, put him on the floor on his back. Using 2 or 3 fingers, give 4 rapid chest thrusts over the breastbone lying in the centre of the chest.

Step 3: If you can now see the foreign object or food in the childís mouth and feel confident that you can easily remove it, pluck it out with your finger.

Step 4: If the child is not breathing, follow step 3 with mouth-to-mouth breathing (see Cardiac Pulmonary Resuscitation and Mouth-To-Mouth Breathing). 

Step 5
: Keep repeating steps 1 to 4 till the child improves or you get some medical help.


Helping An Older Child With Choking
Stand behind the child and wrap your arms around his waist. Make a fist with one hand and grasp it with other hand. Put your fisted hand on the upper abdomen just below the breastbone of his chest. Then press into his abdomen with a sudden springy upward jerk. You may have to do this repeatedly (upto a dozen times) for him to bring up the foreign object (see illustration). As before, mouth-to-mouth breathing may be required if the child is not breathing.

Helping Children With Choking

The Heimlich Manoeuvre
It is now thought that the Heimlich Manoeuvre is too difficult for most people to perform on an unconscious person. The new guidelines say that chest compressions provide the same effect as the Heimlich abdominal thrusts. Itís also no longer necessary to do a finger sweep of the victimís mouth to clear airway obstructions. Chest compressions alone should be enough to expel anything lodged in the airway.
 




7 March, 2016

 
Part 4
The A-Z of Childhood Illnesses

Abdominal Pain
Abrasions or Scratches
Acute Glomerulonephritis
Acute Nephritis
Acute Watery Diarrhoea
Addictions
Adenoids
AIDS
Allergies
Anaemia
Anorexia (Poor Appetite)
Asthma
ADHD
Autism
Backache
Bed-Wetting (Enuresis)
Birth Deformities
Bites and Stings
Bleeding
Bone, Joint and Muscle Injuries
Bowlegs and Knock-Knees
Breathlessness
Bronchiolitis
Burns
Calcium Deficiency
Cancer
Cardiac Pulmonary Resuscitation
Cerebral Palsy (CP)
Chickenpox
Choking
Circumcision
Cleft Lip and Palate
Common Cold
Congenital Heart Disease
Constipation
Convulsions or Fits or Seizures
Cough
Croup
Crying
Cuts
Dengue Fever
Diabetes Mellitus
Diarrhoea, Dysentery ...
Diphtheria
Down's Syndrome
Earache, Ear Infections ...
Electric Shock
Encephalitis
Eye Problems
Fears
Foot Problems
German Measles (Rubella)
Glands in the Neck ...
Headache
Head Injury
Hepatitis
Hydrocephalus
Hypertension
Hypospadias
Influenza (Flu)
Jaundice
Joint Disorders
Kala-Azar
Leptospirosis
Limp and Pain in the Legs
Malaria
Malnutrition (Undernutrition)
Measles
Meningitis
Meningomyelocele
Menstrual Problems
Mental Retardation (MR)
Mouth To Mouth Breathing
Mumps
Nephrotic Syndrome
Nose-Related Problems
Obesity
Pneumonia
Poisoning
Poliomyelitis
Premature Baby
Prolapse of the Rectum
Rabies
Rheumatic Fever
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Rickets
Short Child
Skin Conditions
Sleep and Sleep Problems
Sore Throat (Pharyngitis)
Splinters
Stammering
Stridor (Noisy Breathing)
Teething and Care of Teeth
Tetanus (Lock Jaw)
Thrush
Thumb-Sucking
Tics
Torticollis
Tracheoesophageal Fistula
Tropical Eosinophilia
Tuberculosis (TB)
Typhoid
Umbilical Problems
Undescended Testis
Urinary Infection
Vaginal Discharge
Vomiting
Wheezing
Whooping Cough (Pertusis)



Part 4
Keeping Your Child Healthy
Choosing A Paediatrician
Proper Use of Medicines
Home Remedies
A First Aid Kit
The A-Z of Childhood Illnesses
Psychological Concerns
Managing A Hospital Stay
Emergencies
Prayer And Your Child's Health
The Role of Nature Cure
Homoeopathy
Ayurveda and Child Care
Congenital Heart Disease FAQ
 
Guide to Child Care
Home
Introduction
1 Pregnancy, Childbirth ...
2 The Growing Years
3 Feeding Infants, ...
4 Keeping Your Child Healthy
5 Keeping Your Child Happy
About Dr. R. K. Anand
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