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Part 4: Keeping Your Child Healthy  >  The A-Z of Childhood Illnesses  >  Malaria

MALARIA

Common Malaria (Plasmodium Vivax)

SYMPTOMS: A typical case presents with shivering and high fever, followed by sweating and fall in temperature. The fever comes on alternate days, and the child looks well in between. A history of a child living in an area where malaria is common or the child having returned from such an area aids the diagnosis. A blood test confirms the diagnosis. The patient may become anaemic and weak.

In another case, the fever may occur every day. Shivering or rigours may not be present. If no obvious cause of fever is to be found and your doctor finds your child has an enlarged spleen, he may like to rule out malaria.

DIAGNOSIS: It is important that the blood sample for malaria be taken before treatment is started. This test is not only important for the confirmation of the diagnosis, but also helps to ascertain the type of malaria, the precise treatment to be given immediately and to be followed later.


Falciparum Malaria
SYMPTOMS: Besides shivering and fever, a child with this type of malaria can become quite sick. He may start losing alertness, get convulsions and may become unconscious.

TREATMENT: Treat this condition as an emergency. Many lives are saved by appropriate treatment. Tell your doctor if your child has G-6-PD deficiency (see Anaemia); children with this deficiency may react badly to some of the anti-malarial drugs.

PREVENTION: Cooperate with the public health authorities in the prevention of the spread of this disease. The malaria mosquito can thrive on clean water, so make sure the water storage sources in your building or house are well cared for. In areas where malaria is common, care should be taken to prevent mosquito bites. Have automatic door closers and window netting installed if this is possible. In the near future, we may have mosquito nets that are impregnated with a medicine to repel mosquitoes.

Your doctor may put you on some drug(s) to be taken regularly once a week if you live in a malaria-infested area or you are going to visit such an area. However, some older children and adults may develop partial or complete immunity against the disease after living in a locality with malaria for a number of years, and do not need this continuous prophylactic (preventive) treatment. If, however, you live in an area where malaria is unknown, start giving your child the prophylactic medicines 2 weeks before you start your journey to a malaria area. The drug is to be given throughout the stay in that area and to be continued for 2 months after returning home.

Do not take these drugs without proper advice; indiscriminate use may result in the development of resistance to certain anti-malarial drugs. 




7 March, 2016

 
Part 4
The A-Z of Childhood Illnesses

Abdominal Pain
Abrasions or Scratches
Acute Glomerulonephritis
Acute Nephritis
Acute Watery Diarrhoea
Addictions
Adenoids
AIDS
Allergies
Anaemia
Anorexia (Poor Appetite)
Asthma
ADHD
Autism
Backache
Bed-Wetting (Enuresis)
Birth Deformities
Bites and Stings
Bleeding
Bone, Joint and Muscle Injuries
Bowlegs and Knock-Knees
Breathlessness
Bronchiolitis
Burns
Calcium Deficiency
Cancer
Cardiac Pulmonary Resuscitation
Cerebral Palsy (CP)
Chickenpox
Choking
Circumcision
Cleft Lip and Palate
Common Cold
Congenital Heart Disease
Constipation
Convulsions or Fits or Seizures
Cough
Croup
Crying
Cuts
Dengue Fever
Diabetes Mellitus
Diarrhoea, Dysentery ...
Diphtheria
Down's Syndrome
Earache, Ear Infections ...
Electric Shock
Encephalitis
Eye Problems
Fears
Foot Problems
German Measles (Rubella)
Glands in the Neck ...
Headache
Head Injury
Hepatitis
Hydrocephalus
Hypertension
Hypospadias
Influenza (Flu)
Jaundice
Joint Disorders
Kala-Azar
Leptospirosis
Limp and Pain in the Legs
Malaria
Malnutrition (Undernutrition)
Measles
Meningitis
Meningomyelocele
Menstrual Problems
Mental Retardation (MR)
Mouth To Mouth Breathing
Mumps
Nephrotic Syndrome
Nose-Related Problems
Obesity
Pneumonia
Poisoning
Poliomyelitis
Premature Baby
Prolapse of the Rectum
Rabies
Rheumatic Fever
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Rickets
Short Child
Skin Conditions
Sleep and Sleep Problems
Sore Throat (Pharyngitis)
Splinters
Stammering
Stridor (Noisy Breathing)
Teething and Care of Teeth
Tetanus (Lock Jaw)
Thrush
Thumb-Sucking
Tics
Torticollis
Tracheoesophageal Fistula
Tropical Eosinophilia
Tuberculosis (TB)
Typhoid
Umbilical Problems
Undescended Testis
Urinary Infection
Vaginal Discharge
Vomiting
Wheezing
Whooping Cough (Pertusis)



Part 4
Keeping Your Child Healthy
Choosing A Paediatrician
Proper Use of Medicines
Home Remedies
A First Aid Kit
The A-Z of Childhood Illnesses
Psychological Concerns
Managing A Hospital Stay
Emergencies
Prayer And Your Child's Health
The Role of Nature Cure
Homoeopathy
Ayurveda and Child Care
Congenital Heart Disease FAQ
 
Guide to Child Care
Home
Introduction
1 Pregnancy, Childbirth ...
2 The Growing Years
3 Feeding Infants, ...
4 Keeping Your Child Healthy
5 Keeping Your Child Happy
About Dr. R. K. Anand
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