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Part 4: Keeping Your Child Healthy  >  The A-Z of Childhood Illnesses  >  Urinary Infection

URINARY INFECTION

The Importance Of Diagnosis

Remember the following important facts about urinary infection:

  • It is not an uncommon disease.
  • While proper diagnosis and treatment can help, carelessness in its management can lead to malnutrition and kidney damage.
  • A routine examination of urine may suggest a possibility of infection, but it must be confirmed by urine culture and colony count of bacteria. The diagnosis is clinched if the count is 1 lakh colonies or more per ml. of a single organism. If the count is of this order, a sensitivity test must be done to select the right drug for treatment.
  • The diagnosis is considered in a child with unexplained fever, frequency of micturition (urination), painful urination, unexplained loss of weight, or failure to gain weight.
  • Isolated preauricular tags (tags of skin in front of the ear) may be associated with urinary tract abnormalities. A urinary tract ultrasonography should be conducted in such cases.
  • The urethral opening (opening of the urinary tract above the vagina) is quite near the anal opening in a female child. Parents should clean the anal region after the passage of stools, in the backward direction, away from the urethral opening. Children should be trained accordingly.
  • As long as you change diapers when they need to be changed, the incidence of urinary infection is not affected by whether you use cloth or disposal diapers.


Collection Of Urine Sample

Urine for culture must be collected in a sterile bottle procured from the hospital. A sample must be taken as per the direction of the hospital. A morning sample is not essential. The sample must be taken to the laboratory immediately after collection. If that is not possible, it should be kept in a refrigerator.

TREATMENT: Once a diagnosis is confirmed, the child is given the appropriate drug.

A close follow-up is essential. Urine culture is done a week and 2 weeks after the start of treatment. If the urine is normal, a culture is done once a month for 3 months, once in 3 months for 1 year and then twice a year as long as possible. 

In all male children, a sonography for the urinary tract and a cystoureterogram (an X-ray taken after putting a dye into the bladder) is undertaken a month after the diagnosis is made and treatment has started. The same tests are conducted in female children below the age of 5 years, if they get another attack of urinary tract infection. 

If any abnormality is found in these two tests, an intravenous pyelogram should be done. In this test, the dye is given into the vein and its excretion is followed in the kidneys, ureter and bladder.

Children who get 3 infections in a year are put on a single small dose of a drug, every night, for 2 years or more. 

Less frequently, surgery is indicated in cases of persistent infection, or where abnormalities of the urinary tract need to be tackled surgically.




7 March, 2016

 
Part 4
The A-Z of Childhood Illnesses

Abdominal Pain
Abrasions or Scratches
Acute Glomerulonephritis
Acute Nephritis
Acute Watery Diarrhoea
Addictions
Adenoids
AIDS
Allergies
Anaemia
Anorexia (Poor Appetite)
Asthma
ADHD
Autism
Backache
Bed-Wetting (Enuresis)
Birth Deformities
Bites and Stings
Bleeding
Bone, Joint and Muscle Injuries
Bowlegs and Knock-Knees
Breathlessness
Bronchiolitis
Burns
Calcium Deficiency
Cancer
Cardiac Pulmonary Resuscitation
Cerebral Palsy (CP)
Chickenpox
Choking
Circumcision
Cleft Lip and Palate
Common Cold
Congenital Heart Disease
Constipation
Convulsions or Fits or Seizures
Cough
Croup
Crying
Cuts
Dengue Fever
Diabetes Mellitus
Diarrhoea, Dysentery ...
Diphtheria
Down's Syndrome
Earache, Ear Infections ...
Electric Shock
Encephalitis
Eye Problems
Fears
Foot Problems
German Measles (Rubella)
Glands in the Neck ...
Headache
Head Injury
Hepatitis
Hydrocephalus
Hypertension
Hypospadias
Influenza (Flu)
Jaundice
Joint Disorders
Kala-Azar
Leptospirosis
Limp and Pain in the Legs
Malaria
Malnutrition (Undernutrition)
Measles
Meningitis
Meningomyelocele
Menstrual Problems
Mental Retardation (MR)
Mouth To Mouth Breathing
Mumps
Nephrotic Syndrome
Nose-Related Problems
Obesity
Pneumonia
Poisoning
Poliomyelitis
Premature Baby
Prolapse of the Rectum
Rabies
Rheumatic Fever
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Rickets
Short Child
Skin Conditions
Sleep and Sleep Problems
Sore Throat (Pharyngitis)
Splinters
Stammering
Stridor (Noisy Breathing)
Teething and Care of Teeth
Tetanus (Lock Jaw)
Thrush
Thumb-Sucking
Tics
Torticollis
Tracheoesophageal Fistula
Tropical Eosinophilia
Tuberculosis (TB)
Typhoid
Umbilical Problems
Undescended Testis
Urinary Infection
Vaginal Discharge
Vomiting
Wheezing
Whooping Cough (Pertusis)



Part 4
Keeping Your Child Healthy
Choosing A Paediatrician
Proper Use of Medicines
Home Remedies
A First Aid Kit
The A-Z of Childhood Illnesses
Psychological Concerns
Managing A Hospital Stay
Emergencies
Prayer And Your Child's Health
The Role of Nature Cure
Homoeopathy
Ayurveda and Child Care
Congenital Heart Disease FAQ
 
Guide to Child Care
Home
Introduction
1 Pregnancy, Childbirth ...
2 The Growing Years
3 Feeding Infants, ...
4 Keeping Your Child Healthy
5 Keeping Your Child Happy
About Dr. R. K. Anand
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